Building and the Economy

Building and the Economy

For as long as I can remember, there have always been those in favor of development and those against it.  My opinion, although a little biased, is that building is not only necessary but benefits the economy for millions of families.  For those who oppose it, it seems like the common argument is that they don’t want anyone “moving into their back yard” or “taking away their great views”.  My response to this is, “Unless you live in a teepee, you also moved into someone’s back yard and/or stole their beautiful views when your house was built.”  Another less opinionated view to this debate is to consider the economic benefits that building has on our society.

Construction and infrastructure have always been considered the backbone of the US economy.  In 2016, the top five US builders closed on more than 117,000 dwelling units and had combined revenues of over 40 billion.  The top 200 US builders closed on a combined total of almost 310,000 dwelling units for a whopping 112 billion in revenues.  That equates to approximately 100,000 more homes than are in all of Chester County.  Keep in mind that this is just the construction of new homes; not commercial or institutional projects or infrastructures like roads or bridges nor does it include all of the remodeling projects that happen annually in this country.  This is only the top 200 builders, all of which had revenues exceeding 50 million dollars annually.  There are probably hundreds or even thousands of smaller builders that didn’t make it on the list but still, collectively, construct thousands of new homes each year.

When looking at this in terms of how many people this puts to work or how many families it feeds, it’s an even easier argument to sell.  The 2015 US census for per capita income was just shy of $30,000/year, and the median family income was just over $68,000/year.  This means that the top 200 builders, last year alone, generated enough revenue to employ 3.7 million people and/or 1.65 million families.  Building homes also generate billions of dollars each year in property taxes to pay for our teachers, police officers, firefighters and municipal workers, and funds the maintenance of millions of miles of local roads.  So, before you think of opposing the next planned community, you may want to stop for a minute and think about how you or your family might benefit from all the jobs, taxes and income it will create for your local community.

Rustin Walk (Project Update)

Rustin Walk (Project Update)

 

The “Rustin Walk” subdivision should consider changing its name to “Rustin Run”!  After 2 years in the design and approval process, and another 9 months of infrastructure installation, West Chester’s newest development of luxury single-family estate homes opened for sales.Since the beginning of March, 20 homes are already under contract, 14 of which sold in the 1st two weeks.These homes are flying off the shelves faster than milk and bread during a forecasted snow storm and for good reason!

Designed by D.L. Howell & Associates for Behrle Construction, national home builder NV Homes (a division of Ryan Homes) has created some pretty breathtaking home selections for this equally as breathtaking site.Nestled in Westtown Township in central Chester County, this exclusive development offers spectacular vistas and rolling green meadows surrounded by mature forest and bordered by one of the most elite, privileged high schools in the County.NV Homes has really brought their “A” game to the table with the architecture and loaded amenities in a variety of home models that they offer in this community.Take a walk through the model and you’ll see what I mean.

With such an unbelievable selling pace, this site will be sold out before the end of the summer, so I highly suggest you get out there quick if this location is on your radar.This is truly a one-of-a-kind site!Check out the site in person and/or click on the link below to see what this development has to offer.

http://www.nvhomes.com/neighborhoods/pa/chester/west-chester/rustinwalk